Oct 042010
 

Arts & Letters Daily

ideas, criticism, debate

<strong>Harvey Mansfield</strong> has the tragic pleasure of bringing two books to posthumous publication. The first is by his daughter, the second by his wife

Harvey Mansfield has the tragic pleasure of bringing two books to posthumous publication. The first is by his daughter, the second by his wife
 
 

Students trained to speak in a rarefied lexicon, vying for professors&rsquo; approval, competing for a few, unstable jobs: "<strong>The M.F.A. </strong> is graduate school in a funhouse mirror"

Students trained to speak in a rarefied lexicon, vying for professors’ approval, competing for a few, unstable jobs: "The M.F.A. is graduate school in a funhouse mirror"
 
 

Ponderous, posturing, even silly, <strong>Hemingway</strong>&rsquo;s fiction becomes more out of fashion every year. So why do we still read it?

Ponderous, posturing, even silly, Hemingway’s fiction becomes more out of fashion every year. So why do we still read it?
 
 

<strong>Maya Angelou</strong>, food writer. A recipe &mdash; and its candid, confessional back story &mdash; can be as bracing and uncompromising as her verse and prose

Maya Angelou, food writer. A recipe — and its candid, confessional back story — can be as bracing and uncompromising as her verse and prose
 
 

<strong>Philip Larkin</strong> wrote 4,000 letters home, some masterpieces of curmudgeonly comedy. But over time, his ample gift hardened from playfulness into habit

Philip Larkin wrote 4,000 letters home, some masterpieces of curmudgeonly comedy. But over time, his ample gift hardened from playfulness into habit
 
 

<strong>Pleasure and expertise</strong>. Those who play tennis well or cook well experience a kind of pleasure unavailable to others. Is the same true for those who read well?

Pleasure and expertise. Those who play tennis well or cook well experience a kind of pleasure unavailable to others. Is the same true for those who read well?
 
 

The world&rsquo;s nicest know-it-all. Why does <strong>John McPhee</strong> know so much about Sophia Loren, the Moscow State Circus, and the golf habits of the Washington elite?

The world’s nicest know-it-all. Why does John McPhee know so much about Sophia Loren, the Moscow State Circus, and the golf habits of the Washington elite?
 
 

<strong>Writing weakens the intellect</strong>, or so claimed Socrates. Despite this, two new books set out to rehabilitate classical philosophy

Writing weakens the intellect, or so claimed Socrates. Despite this, two new books set out to rehabilitate classical philosophy
 
 

&ldquo;We&rsquo;re in hot water&rdquo;; &ldquo;the straw that breaks the camel&rsquo;s back&rdquo;; &ldquo;a leopard cannot change its spots&rdquo;: What exactly makes a <strong>clich&eacute;</strong> a clich&eacute;?

“We’re in hot water”; “the straw that breaks the camel’s back”; “a leopard cannot change its spots”: What exactly makes a cliché a cliché?
 
 

The invention of the <strong>telescope sparked a revolution in art</strong>. For Milton, who visited Galileo, seeing the cosmos was a visit from the Muse

The invention of the telescope sparked a revolution in art. For Milton, who visited Galileo, seeing the cosmos was a visit from the Muse
 
 
 Posted by at 2:28 pm

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.