Oct 042010
 

Arts & Letters Daily

ideas, criticism, debate

The puzzle of <strong>human rationality</strong>. Despite our capacity for reason, we are flooded with reminders of our fallacies and follies

The puzzle of human rationality. Despite our capacity for reason, we are flooded with reminders of our fallacies and follies
 
 

&ldquo;Show me a scholar who claims that <strong>science can explain all of literature</strong>, and I will show you someone who is performing schtick&rdquo;&nbsp;&nbsp;

“Show me a scholar who claims that science can explain all of literature, and I will show you someone who is performing schtick”  
 
 

<strong>Ian Fleming</strong> said he wrote for "pleasure and money." True enough, but it shouldn't detract from his literary craftsmanship

Ian Fleming said he wrote for "pleasure and money." True enough, but it shouldn't detract from his literary craftsmanship
 
 

<strong>How have books changed</strong>? &ldquo;They became tedious redoubts for the pious certainties of a besieged, over-educated and underemployed intellectual class&rdquo;&nbsp;

How have books changed? “They became tedious redoubts for the pious certainties of a besieged, over-educated and underemployed intellectual class” 
 
 

<strong>Good criticism</strong> draws out the nuances within the ideas one finds the most noxious, the most difficult to dignify

Good criticism draws out the nuances within the ideas one finds the most noxious, the most difficult to dignify
 
 

For readers, <strong>E.M. Forster</strong> was a stately, mild-mannered bachelor with a staid personal life. When he came out as gay, many felt betrayed

For readers, E.M. Forster was a stately, mild-mannered bachelor with a staid personal life. When he came out as gay, many felt betrayed
 
 

What happens when a libertarian-leaning economist sits down with a <strong>utopian-feminist philosopher</strong>? It gets heated&nbsp;

What happens when a libertarian-leaning economist sits down with a utopian-feminist philosopher? It gets heated 
 
 

<strong>Thoreau</strong> never wanted followers; he didn't even follow his own advice. So what would he make of all these acolytes?&nbsp;&nbsp;

Thoreau never wanted followers; he didn't even follow his own advice. So what would he make of all these acolytes?  
 
 

<strong>Jasper Johns, today</strong>: Many say he's spent the past 30 years in hermitlike conditions and is now part Scrooge, part sphinx. Nonsense&nbsp;&nbsp;

Jasper Johns, today: Many say he's spent the past 30 years in hermitlike conditions and is now part Scrooge, part sphinx. Nonsense  
 
 

<strong>Organizing a bookshelf</strong> imposes order and intimacy on objects of art. What happens when all of our art and culture is stored digitally?&nbsp;

Organizing a bookshelf imposes order and intimacy on objects of art. What happens when all of our art and culture is stored digitally? 
 
 
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