Oct 062005
 

On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being takes up the big questions of meaning with scientists and theologians, artists and teachers — some you know and others you'll love to meet. Each week a new discovery about the immensity of our lives — updated every Thursday. Hosted by Krista Tippett. Discover more at onbeing.org. On Being Studios is the producer of On Being, Becoming Wise, Creating Our Own Lives, and more to come.

Pauline Boss — The Myth of Closure

Pauline Boss — The Myth of Closure

There is no such thing as closure. Family therapist Pauline Boss says that the idea of closure in fact leads us astray — it’s a myth we need to put aside, like the idea we’ve accepted that grief has five linear stages and we come out the other side done with it. She coined the term “ambiguous loss,” creating a new field in family therapy and psychology. And she has wisdom for the complicated griefs and losses in all of our lives and in how we best approach the losses of others — including those very much in our public midst right now.

 
 

[Unedited] Pauline Boss with Krista Tippett

[Unedited] Pauline Boss with Krista TippettPauline Boss is Professor Emeritus at the University of Minnesota. She is the author of "Loss, Trauma and Resilience: Therapeutic Work with Ambiguous Loss," "Loving Someone Who Has Dementia," and "Ambiguous Loss." This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Pauline Boss — The Myth of Closure." Find more at onbeing.org.
 
 

Samar Jarrah, Wajahat Ali, Sahar Ullah, et al. — Revealing Ramadan

Samar Jarrah, Wajahat Ali, Sahar Ullah, et al. — Revealing Ramadan

Sixteen Muslims, in their own words, speak about the delights and gravity of Islam's holiest month. Through vivid memories and light-hearted musings, they reveal the richness of Ramadan — as a period of intimacy, and of parties; of getting up when the world is quiet for breakfast and prayers with one's family; of breaking the fast every day after nightfall in celebration and prayers with friends and strangers.

 
 

Mahzarin Banaji — The Mind Is a Difference-Seeking Machine

Mahzarin Banaji — The Mind Is a Difference-Seeking Machine

The emerging science of implicit bias is one of the most promising fields for animating the human change that makes social change possible. The social psychologist Mahzarin Banaji is one of its primary architects. She understands the mind as a “difference-seeking machine” that helps us order and navigate the overwhelming complexity of reality. But this gift also creates blind spots and biases, as we fill in what we don’t know with the limits of what we do know. This is science that takes our grappling with difference out of the realm of guilt, and into the realm of transformative good.

 
 

[Unedited] Mahzarin Banaji with Krista Tippett

[Unedited] Mahzarin Banaji with Krista TippettMahzarin Banaji is Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics in the department of psychology at Harvard University. She is the co-author of "Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People," and co-founder of the implicit bias research organization Project Implicit. This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Mahzarin Banaji — The Mind Is a Difference-Seeking Machine." Find more at onbeing.org.
 
 

Jonathan Haidt and Melvin Konner — Capitalism and Moral Evolution: A Civil Provocation

Jonathan Haidt and Melvin Konner —  Capitalism and Moral Evolution: A Civil Provocation

It was supposed to be a discussion about "culture and conscience" with two social scientists, as part of a public gathering of the Center for Humans and Nature at the American Museum of Natural History. But Jonathan Haidt is studying the relationship between capitalism and moral evolution, and our conversation took off from there in surprising directions. The liberal view of capitalism as essentially exploitative may remain alive and well, Haidt says. But the ironic truth of history is that capitalism actually generates liberal values as it takes root in societies. Our conversation preceded this American cultural-political season but offers provocative perspective on it.

 
 

[Unedited] Jonathan Haidt + Melvin Konner with Krista Tippett

[Unedited] Jonathan Haidt + Melvin Konner with Krista TippettJonathan Haidt is the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University’s Stern School of Business. His books include "The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion" and, forthcoming in 2017, "Three Stories about Capitalism: The moral psychology of economic life." Melvin Konner is the Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Anthropology and of Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology at Emory University. His books include "The Tangled Wing: Biological Constraints on the Human Spirit" and "The Evolution of Childhood." This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Jonathan Haidt and Melvin Konner — Capitalism and Moral Evolution: A Civil Provocation." Find more at onbeing.org.
 
 

Rebecca Solnit — Falling Together

Rebecca Solnit — Falling Together

A singular writer and thinker, Rebecca Solnit celebrates the unpredictable and incalculable events that so often redeem our lives both solitary and public. She searches for the hidden, transformative histories inside events we chronicle merely as disasters, in places like post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans. She writes that, so often, "when all the ordinary divides and patterns are shattered, people step up to become their brothers' keepers. And that purposefulness and connectedness bring joy even amidst death, chaos, fear, and loss."

 
 

[Unedited] Rebecca Solnit with Krista Tippett

[Unedited] Rebecca Solnit with Krista TippettRebecca Solnit is a contributing editor at Harper's Magazine and a regular writer for publications including The Guardian and The London Review of Books. Her books include "A Paradise Built in Hell: The Extraordinary Communities that Arise in Disaster" and "Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities." This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Rebecca Solnit — Falling Together." Find more at onbeing.org.
 
 

Kevin Kling — The Losses and Laughter We Grow Into

Kevin Kling — The Losses and Laughter We Grow Into

Kevin Kling is part funny guy, part poet and playwright, part wise man. A treasured figure on the national storytelling circuit, his voice inhabits an unusual space — where a homegrown Minnesota wit meets Dante and Shakespeare. Born with a disabled left arm, he lost the use of his right one after a motorcycle accident nearly killed him. He shares his special angle on life's humor and its ruptures — and why we turn loss into story.

 
 

[Unedited] Kevin Kling with Krista Tippett

[Unedited] Kevin Kling with Krista TippettKevin Kling is a performer and an advisory council member of Interact. His plays include "21A" and "Lloyd's Prayer." His books include "The Dog Says How." The new PBS documentary about his life and work is called "Kevin Kling: Lost and Found." This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Kevin Kling — The Losses and Laughter We Grow Into." Find more at onbeing.org.
 
 

David Isay — Listening as an Act of Love

David Isay — Listening as an Act of Love

"The soul is contained in the human voice," says David Isay, founder of StoryCorps. He sees the StoryCorps booth — a setting where two people ask the questions they’ve always wanted to ask each other — as a sacred space. He shares his wisdom about listening as an act of love, and how eliciting and capturing our stories is a way of insisting that every life matters.

 
 
 Posted by at 2:20 pm

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.